The Federated Archaeological Information Management Systems (FAIMS) Project is an Australian, university-based initiative developing a generalized, open-source mobile data collection platform that can be customized for diverse... more
The Federated Archaeological Information Management Systems (FAIMS) Project is an Australian, university-based initiative developing a generalized, open-source mobile data collection platform that can be customized for diverse archaeological activities. Three field directors report their experiences adapting FAIMS software to projects in Turkey, Malawi, and Peru, highlighting three themes: (1) the transition from paper to digital recording has upfront costs with backend pay-off, (2) the transition involves decisions and tradeoffs that archaeologists and technologists need to make together, and (3) digital recording has both short- and long-term benefits. In the short-term, project directors reported efficient acquisition of richer, more accurate, data. Longer-term, they anticipated that the availability of comprehensive, born-digital datasets would support rigorous demonstration of field intuitions and faster publication of more complete datasets. We argue that cooperative development involving archaeologists and technologists can produce high-quality, fit-for-purpose software, representing the best chance to embedding new technology in established projects.
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This chapter summarises the experience acquired by the Federated Archaeological Information Management Systems (FAIMS) project over the course of developing opensource software for archaeologists. open-source software development, which... more
This chapter summarises the experience acquired by the Federated Archaeological Information Management Systems (FAIMS) project over the course of developing opensource software for archaeologists. open-source software development, which excels at coordinating discrete contributions from many people and organisations, offers the best hope for producing complex and expensive tools in a discipline where resources are limited. Over the course of this project, we have come to realise that open-source approaches have applications in archaeological research beyond the development of software itself. The development of redeployable field recording systems, which must be flexible and robust in order to accommodate the diversity of archaeological data, represent one such application. FAIMS project software facilitates this type of development by separating the (large and complicated) application code from the (relatively simple and largely human-readable) document files that customise the application for use by a particular project. Distributed version control systems like GitHub, which are already being used for texts and documents beyond code, provide a capable platform for coordinating peer production of these destnition documents. FAIMS has used GitHub successfully for its internal development of early-adopter field projects over the last year, demonstrating its potential. Just as open-source approaches have improved software by bringing the insights of an entire community to bear on diffcult problems, field recording systems - as well as the methods and approaches they embody - also benefit from the transparency provided by wide distribution and collaboration facilitated by version control systems.
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This paper presents three key problems addressed by the Federated Archaeological Information Management Systems (FAIMS) project and presented during a Round Table session at the 2013 CAA. FAIMS is a major Australian digital infrastructure... more
This paper presents three key problems addressed by the Federated Archaeological Information Management Systems (FAIMS) project and presented during a Round Table session at the 2013 CAA. FAIMS is a major Australian digital infrastructure project established in 2012 to develop open source eResearch tools to improve archaeological data management. We first review existing Android GIS applications and discuss their performance and suitability for archaeological fieldwork in remote locations, before presenting the lessons of this review for FAIMS mobile application development. We then discuss the variety of Australian archaeological practice, suggesting how semantically compatible datasets may be produced from diverse sources at the time of data creation. Finally, we introduce the data structure underlying our mobile application, which accommodates a wide range of practices and data models while promoting syntactic and semantic dataset compatibility.
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In this article, the Federated Archaeological Information Management Systems (FAIMS) project presents its stocktaking activities and software development towards the creation of a comprehensive digital infrastructure for... more
In this article, the Federated Archaeological Information
Management Systems (FAIMS) project presents its
stocktaking activities and software development towards
the creation of a comprehensive digital infrastructure for
archaeologists. A National eResearch Collaboration Tools
and Resources (NeCTAR)-funded initiative, the FAIMS project
aims to develop tools to facilitate the creation, sharing, reuse
and dissemination of high-quality digital datasets for
research and cultural heritage management. FAIMS has
engaged in an extensive stocktaking and liaison programme
with archaeologists and related professionals, the results
of which have shaped the development plans. Project
development is focusing on highly customisable mobile
applications for data collection, a web application for data
processing, and an online repository for archiving and
disseminating data, with provisions for creating semantically
and technically compatible datasets embedded throughout.
Data exchange using standard formats and approaches
ensures that components work well together, and that new,
externally developed tools can be added later. Our goal is
to create a digital system that respects the current workflow
of archaeological practice, improves the availability of
compatible archaeological data, and delivers features that
archaeologists want to use.
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This paper explores the way that Twitter has democratized usage and enabled non-localized proximity for users. We examine some recent changes in usages to demonstrate how public discourse, communication and information distribution... more
This paper explores the way that Twitter has democratized usage and enabled non-localized proximity for users. We examine some recent changes in usages to demonstrate how public discourse, communication and information distribution affords users new ways of socializing and communicating. We also examine how Twitter has enabled individual non-technical users to communicate, collaborate and distribute information across social and geographic boundaries.
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In this paper, we document and discuss a number of interface explorations conducted while building a cable-array robotic sculpture in the form of a fiberglass flying Manta Ray. Our two primary interface devices were a gesture sensing... more
In this paper, we document and discuss a number of interface
explorations conducted while building a cable-array robotic sculpture in the
form of a fiberglass flying Manta Ray. Our two primary interface devices were
a gesture sensing Essential Reality P5 glove and a Microsoft Xbox 360 game
controller. We also offer a conceptual design space comprising three axes:
mapping, frame of reference, and interface location. This design space lets us
discuss and compare all of our explorations and envision other potentially
interesting interfaces.
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What is data? That question is the fundamental investigation of this dissertation. I have developed a methodology from social-scientific processes to explore how different people understand the concept of data, rather than to rely on my... more
What is data? That question is the fundamental investigation of this dissertation. I have developed a methodology from social-scientific processes to explore how different people understand the concept of data, rather than to rely on my own philosophical intuitions or thought experiments about the “nature” of data. The evidence I have gathered as to different individuals’ constructions of data can be used to inform further inquiry of data and the design of information systems.

My research demonstrates that people have different constructions of data. The methodology of the Social Data Flow Network, created for this dissertation, has proven able to probe those understandings. The Social Data Flow Network, loosely based on a Data Flow Diagram and combined with ideas from Social Network Analysis, provides a way of discovering practical definitions of hard-to-operationalize terms like data. The process of repeatedly categorizing various items as data allows the methodology to explore how participants actually use the term, rather than relying on theoretical dictionary-based definitions.

Analysis of the interviews found three different constructions of data: data as communications, a container for meaning; data as subjective observations, sense-impressions filtered by knowledge; and data as objective facts, measurements revealing the relationships of reality
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We have created and flown a cable array robot based flying sculpture. This sculpture, in its various versions, flew in both Rochester, New York and London, England. This thesis both explores the construction of the flying sculpture and... more
We have created and flown a cable array robot based flying sculpture. This sculpture, in its various versions, flew in both Rochester, New York and London, England. This thesis both explores the construction of the flying sculpture and presents a published paper wherein an Human-Robotic Interaction design space is proposed to facilitate discussion of robotic interfaces.
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Mobilizing the Past is a collection of 20 articles that explore the use and impact of mobile digital technology in archaeological field practice. The detailed case studies present in this volume range from drones in the Andes to iPads at... more
Mobilizing the Past is a collection of 20 articles that explore the use and impact of mobile digital technology in archaeological field practice. The detailed case studies present in this volume range from drones in the Andes to iPads at Pompeii, digital workflows in the American Southwest, and examples of how bespoke, DIY, and commercial software provide solutions and craft novel challenges for field archaeologists. The range of projects and contexts ensures that Mobilizing the Past for a Digital Future is far more than a state-of-the-field manual or technical handbook. Instead, the contributors embrace the growing spirit of critique present in digital archaeology. This critical edge, backed by real projects, systems, and experiences, gives the book lasting value as both a glimpse into present practices as well as the anxieties and enthusiasm associated with the most recent generation of mobile digital tools. This book emerged from a workshop funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities held in 2015 at Wentworth Institute of Technology in Boston. The workshop brought together over 20 leading practitioners of digital archaeology in the U.S. for a weekend of conversation. The papers in this volume reflect the discussions at this workshop with significant additional content. Starting with an expansive introduction and concluding with a series of reflective papers, this volume illustrates how tablets, connectivity, sophisticated software, and powerful computers have transformed field practices and offer potential for a radically transformed discipline.

Individual chapters are available for free download, here:
http://dc.uwm.edu/arthist_mobilizingthepast/
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For more information, please visit: https://thedigitalpress.org/mobilizing-the-past-for-a-digital-future/ Mobilizing the Past is a collection of 20 articles that explore the use and impact of mobile digital technology in archaeological... more
For more information, please visit:
https://thedigitalpress.org/mobilizing-the-past-for-a-digital-future/

Mobilizing the Past is a collection of 20 articles that explore the use and impact of mobile digital technology in archaeological field practice. The detailed case studies present in this volume range from drones in the Andes to iPads at Pompeii, digital workflows in the American Southwest, and examples of how bespoke, DIY, and commercial software provide solutions and craft novel challenges for field archaeologist. The range of projects and contexts ensures that Mobilizing the Past for a Digital Future is far more than a state-of-the-field manual or technical handbook. Instead, the contributors embrace the growing spirit of critique present in digital archaeology. This critical edge, backed by real projects, systems, and experiences, gives the book lasting value as both a glimpse into present practices as well as the anxieties and enthusiasm associated with the most recent generation of mobile digital tools.
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We have developed a geochemical sampling application for use on Android tablets. This app was developed together with the Federated Archaeological Information Management Systems (FAIMS) at Macquarie University and is based on the open... more
We have developed a geochemical sampling application for use on Android tablets. This app was developed together with the Federated Archaeological Information
Management Systems (FAIMS) at Macquarie University and is based on the open source FAIMS mobile platform. The FAIMS mobile platform has proved valuable for
groundwater, vegetation, soil and rock sample collection due to the ability to customise data collection methodologies for any field research.
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The articulation of effective character requirements during the process of character creation in a RPG can provide for more interesting, functional, and rewarding characters for all players at the table. This document explores a... more
The articulation of effective character requirements during the
process of character creation in a RPG can provide for more
interesting, functional, and rewarding characters for all players at
the table. This document explores a theoretical model of character
interaction that relates a character’s mechanical and narrative
components to the underlying game and applies that model to the
practice of character creation in D&D. This model includes three
levels: the mechanical-theoretical, a design space of potential
choices; the mechanical-functional, an articulation of instantiated
choices within the rules, and the story-expression level, providing
links between the desired character narrative and the earlier
levels. With these requirements, we then provide methodologies
for individual and group character creation using the theoretical
model.
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Many different approaches to the understanding of RPG rules exist within the gaming community. The rules as written conflict with the player’s urge to mimic reality. The freedom of a game master’s imagination fights with the reassuring... more
Many different approaches to the understanding of RPG rules
exist within the gaming community. The rules as written conflict
with the player’s urge to mimic reality. The freedom of a game
master’s imagination fights with the reassuring weight of
authority of established sources. From these axes, a design space
emerges. We label the quadrants of the design space with the
classic archetypes of RPGs. Clerics (Jurists) find answers to rules
questions within the rules as written. Magic Users (Innovators)
invent new rules to complement the sourcebooks. Fighters
(Realists) use external reality to inform the rules-as-intended.
Thieves (Imaginatives) obey the rule-of-cool and consider that
anything goes in the pursuit of entertainment. We apply this
design space to a case study of interesting questions and answers
found on the RPG.stackexchange.com site, and apply archetypes
to the answers we found.
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